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Department of Anatomyhttp://anatomy.ucsf.edu/
 

Jeroen Roose, PI


jeroen.roose@ucsf.edu

ROOSE LAB UCSF

513 Parnassus Avenue

Health Science West, HSW1300

San Francisco

CA 94143, USA

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Postdoctoral fellows

Graduate students

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LAB MEMBERS 

Where are they now?

Roose Laboratory | University of California, San Francisco | Department of Anatomy | 513 Parnassus Avenue HSW 1330 | San Francisco CA 94143-0452

Staff

Undergraduate students

Click and find out !Past_members.html

Philippe Depeille

Philippe.Depeille@ucsf.edu


I am interested in understanding the role of RasGRP1 and SOS1 in epithelial cells in normal and pathological context such as cancer. For my investigations, I am using in vitro and in vivo approaches to study the intestinal tract.

Jesse Jun

pigsy2001@gmail.com


I am interested in understanding how distinct types of Ras-ERK signals regulate T cell function and how SOS may be at the origin of these distinct signals and T cell fates.

Darienne Myers

Darienne.Myers@ucsf.edu


My project focusses on understanding how Rasgrp variants signal to distinct downstream signaling pathways and how this affects the quality and character of T- and B-cell interactions.

Laila Karra



I am interested in understanding the topology of the Ras signaling network in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) and how we can exploit new knowledge for better therapy.

Michelle (Oghenekvwe) Gbenedio

Oghenekevwe.Gbenedio@ucsf.edu


I focus on a single mRNA counting image techniques to better understand intestinal epithelial cell fate decisions.

Lelaine Pata



Supporting Service

Administrative support

Andy Dang

Andy.Dang@ucsf.edu


Administrative Assistant

Administrative support for Jeroen Roose

phone: 415-476-4164

Marsilius Mues

Marsilius.Mues@ucsf.edu


My research focusses on understanding how different biochemical pathways cooperate in an aberrant manner in T cell leukemia with the goal of interfering with these leukemogenic signals.

Lab support

Alex Samocha

Alex.Samocha@ucsf.edu


I am interested in understanding how distinct Ras signals affect development of various tissues.

Emilia Norlin

Emilia.Norlin@ucsf.edu


My work is centered on alterations in effector kinase pathways triggered by Rasgrp1 variants and how these signals impact CD4 T cell function.

Saikat Banerjee



I am interested how different regulatory mechanisms for the RasGEF SOS1 impact Ras-kinases signaling and the function of peripheral T cells.

Catherine Hartzell



My research focusses on understanding the molecular mechanisms of RasGRP1 autoinhibition and activation and how alterations herein may result in diseases such as autoimmunity.